Meghalaya’s Living Bridges

In Meghalaya, India, “the wettest place on Earth”, summer monsoons cause floods and rapids that are nearly imposible to cross. Residents have responded by building “living bridges” out of the roots of fig trees. These still-living roots allow bridges that continue to grow and strengthen over the years. No one person can complete a bridge alone, so the practice is passed down from one generation to the next, with the construction of bridges spanning entire lifetimes.

This is sustainable architecture in practice, and a stunning testament to the power of collaboration.

This level of  wisdom , foresight , planning and collaboration is needed urban India which virtually languishes from lack of all four attributes on part of successive governments and citizen groups.



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2 Responses to “Meghalaya’s Living Bridges”

  1. [...] of today there are many societies that function as part of nature and not independent from it – Meghalaya’s living bridges are a fine example of the same. Known to receive the highest levels of rainfall, the residents of [...]

  2. Hey there! This is my first visit to your blog! We are
    a team of volunteers and starting a new initiative in a community in the
    same niche. Your blog provided us valuable information to work on.
    You have done a marvellous job!

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